Indium (In)

Indium (In)

Discovered spectroscopically in 1863 and isolated in 1864, indium is named for the indigo (blue) line in its spectrum. It is most frequently associated with zinc materials, is a by-product of zinc refinement, and can be found in iron, lead, and copper ores.

This post-transition metal is very soft and silvery-white with a bright luster. It wets glass and makes a high-pitched noise when bent (due to crystal twinning).

Indium is critical to modern technology, especially in the semiconductor industry. It is used to make alloys with low melting temperatures; in soft-metal high-vacuum seals; to create transparent conductive coatings on glass, and in transistors, rectifiers, thermistors, and photoconductors.

Quantity 
  • (13)
  • (9)
  • (7)
  • (7)
  • (6)
  • (6)
  • (6)
  • (6)
  • (4)
  • (4)
  • (4)
  • (3)
  • (2)
  • (2)
  • (2)
  • (2)
  • (2)
  • (2)
  • (2)
  • (1)
  • (1)
  • (1)
  • (1)
  • (1)
  • (1)
  • (1)
  • (1)
  • (1)
  • (1)
  • (1)
  • (1)
  • (1)
  • (1)
  • (1)
  • (1)
Form 
  • (24)
  • (21)
  • (18)
  • (12)
  • (10)
  • (6)
  • (4)
  • (3)
  • (2)
Percent Purity 
  • (21)
  • (7)
  • (7)
  • (7)
  • (6)
  • (4)
  • (3)
  • (3)
  • (3)
Color 
  • (36)
  • (7)
  • (5)
  • (2)
  • (1)

Filtered Search Results

Products from some of our suppliers do not display in filtered search results. Please clear all filters to see these products.

Filter By

Filter By

  • (1)
  • (104)
  • (1)
  • (1)
  • (13)
  • (9)
  • (7)
  • (7)
  • (6)
  • (6)
  • (6)
  • (6)
  • (4)
  • (4)
  • (4)
  • (3)
  • (2)
  • (2)
  • (2)
  • (2)
  • (2)
  • (2)
  • (2)
  • (1)
  • (1)
  • (1)
  • (1)
  • (1)
  • (1)
  • (1)
  • (1)
  • (1)
  • (1)
  • (1)
  • (1)
  • (1)
  • (1)
  • (1)
  • (1)
  • (24)
  • (21)
  • (18)
  • (12)
  • (10)
  • (6)
  • (4)
  • (3)
  • (2)
  • (21)
  • (7)
  • (7)
  • (7)
  • (6)
  • (4)
  • (3)
  • (3)
  • (3)
  • (36)
  • (7)
  • (5)
  • (2)
  • (1)
  • (29)
  • (5)
  • (15)
  • (5)
  • (2)
  • (15)
  • (5)